Computer Intelligence
May 26, 2021


There is no such thing as computer intelligence, not with today's software technology.  The design of our software is currently based on the practice of hard coding logic independent of the information used in any computer process. This method of software development separates the knowledge of what the information represents from the software logic that processes it.

Computers represent information as one or more of bits.  The computer can compare, add, branch and assign bits. The intelligent meaning of the bits and the reason for an operation is not know. This knowledge is only know to the programmer. The specific reason is only known for the five minutes while the programmer enters a line of code.  The programming language itself does not convey any knowledge about the reason, accuracy, or purpose on how it relates to logic.

The "Jane" system is to break away from traditional programming of having the intelligence about information lock away in proprietary code, and have all that intelligence stored at part of the information's actual data structure. This is what I will call "Application Independent Information".  The "Jane" system will have a single data structure for the storage and transport of intelligence about information. It will also enable an infinite amount of knowledge to be associated with every value. A place to permanently store knowledge in a way that all logic will have access to it. That being said, the reverse is also true, that every piece of information will have access to all the logic that is associated to that information. This removes the glass boundaries between applications.

There is far more to intelligence than just have information available to logic. It also requires some judgment on how information is perceived. This implies "context" which is information that must also be available.  We keep pushing what "WE" know to the side, and expect that everyone knows what we know.  So we expect the computer to have what we consider as common knowledge, which it does not.