Octal (3 Bit) Word Size

 

I was looking at Morse Code, which is basically a 2 bit encoding system

00 = dot, 01 = dash, 10 = end of character (3 pauses), 11 = end of word (7 pauses)

Also looking at Flag Semaphore which is a two sparse 4 bit encoding system (every 45 degrees)

Right hand (0000) Left hand(0001) = A or 1 (depending on the mode, a "number" begin with a # signal)

So I am thinking of using an Octal (base 8) 3 bit encoding system for all information. This would make the math and logical part of the computer very fast and much simpler (only math operations on number, logical operations on boolean, ...). This should make the hardware simpler (first 3 bits determines which set of op-codes to use - if any).

First 3 bits indicates what follows:

  • 000 = word  (word library index , word index ; )
  • 001 = space 
  • 010 = term (term library index , term index ;)
  • 011 = boolean (true or false ;)
  • 100 = character (symbol library index , symbol index ;)
  • 101 = cast (cast library term index , case value index , value trip length , trips ;)

Intermediate Octal values are 0 thru 6

110 = end of value  (;)
111 = end of field  (;)

000 000 111 = Clif (read as 007) Word number 1

 

9 bit for an octal computer, currently stored as 24 bits. In an Octal Computer there are no size limitation on any value, this includes numbers. This format allows Jane to use one format for memory-stored-values and for disk-stored-values. This means there is no translation of information when sent from one computer to another, or from memory to / from disk.  Octal is much easier to read than Hex. The base of the system could be selectable, it's just software, so for running simulations on a project, timings based on number base systems could be run.  Jane is just software so setting the word size is possible to any value at any time.

10 gigabit network speed is achieved using 4 pairs of wires and one ground for a total of 9 wires. A base 16 word (4 bits) might be a better choice. I will try them both.


 

Common Cast Values, and defined bit structures (TBD, each cast value defines it's own structure)

  1. Number  (sign (first bit) - mantissa , sign (first bit) - Decimal Number, sign (first bit) Exponent , base ;)
  2. Numbers (a set of numbers)
  3. Text ( total word count , type (word, char, term, number), word indexes ;)
  4. Set of Text (a set of text)
  5. Script (cast type,  Text);
  6. Scripts (Set of Scripts)
  7. Date ( year, month,  day ;)
  8. Dates (Set of Dates)
  9. Time (hour , minute , second , milliseconds , picoseconds, femtoseconds, zeptoseconds, yoctoseconds, plank time;)
  10. Times (set of Times)
  11. Style (style library index , style index ;)
  12. Styles (set of Styles)
  13. Address ( street name , street number , apartment , street name , city , state , zip code , country ; )
  14. Addresses (set of Named addresses)
  15. Phone Number (country code , area code , number ;)
  16. Named Phone Numbers (set of Named Phone Numbers)
  17. Person Name ( Title, First Name , Middle Name , Middle Initial ,  Named Values ( as in: Nick Name,  Pen Name, Stage Name ,...) ; )
  18. Person Names (set of Person Names)
  19. Named Value ( Name , Value ; )
  20. Named Values (Set of Named Values)
  21. Math Expression ( set of named values ...)
  22. Math Expressions ( set of math expressions.)
  23. ...

 

Number Base defines the a Bit Group (BG) (3 is as trip, 4 is a nibble, 8 is a byte, ...): 

base 1 = 1 bit , base 2 = 1 bits, base 3 = 2 bits, base 4 = 3 bits, base  5 = 3 bits,
base 6 = 3 bits, base 7 = 3 bits, base 8 = 4 bits, base 9 = 4 bits, base 10 = 4 bits, ...

A base of not 2N frees up bits for other purposes (i.e. control characters  Base = 5, 3 bits) -- (0-4 used), (101, 110, 111 are not used). Maybe have a Number of Bits per group difference from the Number Base.  Bits = 4,  Base = 7   xxxf   (8 numbers used, 8 numbers not used)

Base 8 numbers

001 111 001 111 000 101 111 111 = 1.5
001 111 001 111 000 011 111 111 = 1.3

We need to represent exact real numbers of infinite size. Each number can  have a unique base, a unique assigned digits of precision, a unique tolerance value (+.005, -.004), and specific units.

Numbers have some of these fields:

  1. Number Base
  2. Signed Whole Number
  3. Decimal Digits
  4. Signed Exponent Number
  5. Tolerance
  6. Units

Types of Numbers (Simple and Complex, each is a unique cast value with unique characteristics and logic):

  1. Integer
  2. Real Number
  3. Counting Number
  4. Whole Number
  5. Index
  6. Base Memory Address
  7. Memory Address
  8. Memory Address Offset
  9. Complex Numbers
  10. Measurement
    1. Age of (Human, Concrete, Stone, Solar System, ...)
    2. Calendar of (American, Egyptian, Solar, Gezer, Julian, Florentine, Swedish, ...)
    3. Duration
    4. Length
    5. Area
    6. Weight
    7. Nominal
    8. Ordinal
    9. Interval (of)
    10. Ratio (of)
    11. Percent (of)
    12. Temperature
    13. Speed
    14. Acceleration
    15. Pain Level
    16. Grade of Eggs
    17. School Grade
    18. Test Scores
    19. ...

It is possible to use a non integer Base Number (24.5) or a negative Base number (2-4)  or a Base as a function of N (2f(n)).